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What 2021 is bringing to Digital Asset Management

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Digital asset management is a growing market. It attained a global $3.88 billion mark globally in 2020 and it looks like the only way is up.

Digital asset management is a software solution to the problem of storing, retrieving, and using digital assets. Digital assets include web pages, text documents, blueprints, audio files, graphics, and videos among other types of files.

Digital asset management solutions make it easy to access data as well as edit and share it through an integrated interface. Organizations and businesses are increasingly working online and collaborating from remote locations. This makes digital asset management an essential business service.

Why DAM will Gain Popularity

DAMs will gain more and more users who will need help managing digital files. DAM software fits in well with content management systems for example. This provides a more cohesive experience.

There are multiple types of DAM software that one can either host on-site or on the cloud. Get the best by comparing a range of DAM software tools to find the one that meets your personal needs. You want a DAM tool that can do all this:

  • Asset organization
  • Easy asset sharing both internally and externally
  • Doing away with duplicated assets
  • Help with version control

To get the most out of DAM software, take time to understand it and what it can do.

Multi-Channel Automated Marketing

Last year’s lockdowns saw many companies ramp up their online marketing investments. This increase in online marketing spending continues into 2021 and will probably go on for years afterward.

This focus on online marketing has created more work. People have to work on blogs, build social media engagement, conduct analyses, etc. Marketing departments have to do a lot more work across multiple social media channels using the same budget that they had before.

DAM software can make this a lot easier. It can automate some tasks and create a more user-friendly interface.

They can make it easier for users to share files and distribute them in a usable format. Before 2022, DAM software will be even more widely used. More companies will appreciate the practicality of DAM.

Blockchain and DAM

Blockchain technology has great potential for uses other than tracing bitcoin. Merging bitcoin technology with Digital Asset Management could create a better solution that delivers a higher level of security – letting users know whether an image is unaltered or data unchanged.

Tools that Enable Automatic Tagging

Tagging images and text files can be tedious. DAM relies on metadata to enable users to search for files and find them. Automatic tagging is central to metadata.

DAM can recognize the information in image and text files and automatically suitable tags. OCR automatically detects the content inside text files and tags them automatically.

Soon, natural language processing will make it possible for DAM systems to automatically recognize video as well as audio files.

The evolution of these tools could soon make manual tagging a thing of the past.

Business

Navigating the Crossroads: America’s Growing Distrust in Tech Giants

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In a digital age where information flows seamlessly across screens, the influence wielded by major technology companies is undergoing heightened scrutiny. According to a recent Pew Research Center study, an increasing number of Americans believe that social media platforms and big tech companies hold excessive power in shaping political and social landscapes. This survey, conducted among 10,133 U.S. adults from February 7 to 11, 2024, underscores a pivotal shift in public perception that could catalyze significant regulatory and corporate changes.

The Surge of Skepticism

The Pew report reveals that 78% of Americans now think social media companies have too much influence on politics, a notable rise from 72% in 2020. This sentiment is not confined to one political spectrum but is particularly pronounced among Democrats, whose wariness has surged from 63% to 74% in four years. Such figures are alarming, signaling a widespread concern that extends beyond the realm of social media to encompass the broader tech industry.

Partisan Perspectives on Political Power

Analysis shows that while the concern about overreach is bipartisan, the nuances vary. A substantial 84% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents see these platforms as overly powerful, a view that has remained relatively stable. However, this concern has grown among Democrats and their leaners, from 63% in 2020 to 74% in 2024, illustrating a significant shift in their trust towards these corporations.

The Censorship Controversy

Amidst these perceptions of power imbalance, another significant issue stands out: censorship. The Pew study found that a vast majority, approximately 83% of respondents, believe that tech companies likely censor political viewpoints they disagree with. This view has climbed from 77% in 2022, suggesting a growing mistrust in the impartiality of these platforms. Detailed data regarding the methodology and survey design further validate these findings.

Bias and Beyond

The issue of bias extends into the broader landscape of tech’s role in media and politics. The research indicates that 44% of Americans think major tech companies support liberal views over conservative ones—a perspective predominantly held by Republicans. This perception impacts how both news and information are disseminated and consumed, raising questions about fairness and the fundamental principles of freedom of speech.

Regulatory Reckoning

With rising concerns comes a clarion call for stricter regulation. About half of the study’s participants advocate for more governmental oversight of tech companies, a sentiment that aligns with the federal push towards more stringent tech regulations. This perspective is particularly strong among Democrats, 60% of whom support increased regulation compared to 45% of Republicans.

Media and Public Sentiment

The relationship between social media and public sentiment is complex. Platforms like Twitter and Facebook are under increasing scrutiny for their roles in political processes, with debates intensifying over their responsibilities and the ethical implications of their operational decisions. This scrutiny is not limited to the United States; it is a global concern that resonates across borders, highlighting the need for a balanced approach that safeguards democratic values while fostering technological advancement.

Looking Ahead

As we stand at the crossroads of innovation and influence, the path forward involves navigating the delicate balance between harnessing technological potential and safeguarding civic spaces from corporate overreach. The ongoing discussions in academic and policy-making circles, such as those led by Harvard University, highlight the complexity of these issues and the need for informed, nuanced approaches to regulation and governance.

In conclusion, the Pew Research Center’s findings serve as a pivotal reference point for stakeholders across the political, social, and corporate spectra. As America grapples with the dual forces of technological prowess and public accountability, the outcomes of these debates will undoubtedly shape the landscape of tech governance for years to come, making it imperative for ongoing engagement and dialogue among all sectors of society.

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Automation

IBM Acquires HashiCorp for $6.4 Billion, Bolstering Its Multicloud Automation Capabilities

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In a strategic move to enhance its multicloud automation capabilities, IBM has acquired HashiCorp for $6.4 billion, signaling a significant expansion of its hybrid cloud strategy. This acquisition underscores the growing importance of cloud technology in the digital economy and represents a pivotal moment in the evolution of enterprise computing.

HashiCorp, a company long known for its robust cloud infrastructure automation tools, has established itself as a critical player in the cloud ecosystem. With technology agreements with all major cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud, and Microsoft Azure, HashiCorp brings a wealth of expertise and technology to IBM’s portfolio. The acquisition is a strategic fit for IBM, enhancing its existing capabilities and providing comprehensive solutions across various cloud environments.

During a conference call announcing the deal, Arvind Krishna, IBM’s chairman and chief executive officer, highlighted the synergies between the two companies. “HashiCorp is a company we have partnered with for a long time and believe is a tremendous strategic fit with IBM,” Krishna stated. He pointed out the increasing challenges that enterprise clients face in managing sprawling infrastructure applications spread across public and private clouds, as well as on-premises environments.

The timing of this acquisition aligns with the rapid deployment of generative AI and traditional workloads, which necessitates more sophisticated infrastructure strategies. Developers are currently navigating an increasingly heterogeneous, dynamic, and complex landscape, making HashiCorp’s solutions more relevant than ever. “As generative AI deployment accelerates alongside traditional workloads, developers are working with increasingly heterogeneous, dynamic, and complex infrastructure strategies,” Krishna explained.

HashiCorp’s flagship product, TerraForm, stands out as the industry standard for infrastructure automation in these environments. With a focus on security, which is a top concern for every enterprise today, TerraForm offers tools that significantly ease the complexities of managing hybrid and multicloud environments. According to Krishna, “TerraForm is the industry standard for infrastructure automation for these environments with security top of mind for every enterprise.”

The integration of HashiCorp will extend the capabilities of IBM’s existing hybrid cloud offerings, particularly those provided by Red Hat. This will enable IBM to offer end-to-end automated infrastructure and security lifecycle management, further enhancing its competitive edge in the cloud services market.

This acquisition also reflects a broader industry trend where major technology companies are increasingly seeking to consolidate their positions in the cloud sector through strategic acquisitions. Companies are recognizing the need to provide integrated solutions that can handle the complexity of modern IT environments, which often span multiple cloud providers and incorporate a mix of legacy and cloud-native applications.

As the cloud computing landscape continues to evolve, the demand for tools that can automate and secure cloud infrastructures is expected to grow. IBM’s acquisition of HashiCorp is a clear indication that the company is looking to lead this wave of transformation, providing its clients with the tools they need to navigate the complexities of digital transformation.

For further information on IBM’s cloud strategy and offerings, you can visit their official website. This acquisition is not only a significant milestone for IBM but also for the broader cloud technology ecosystem, marking a new chapter in the way enterprises will manage their digital infrastructures in the future.

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Business

Canada Bolsters National Security by Tightening Foreign Investment Rules in AI and Space Tech Sectors

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In an unprecedented move signaling growing concerns over national security and technological sovereignty, the Canadian government has announced plans to intensify its scrutiny of foreign investments in critical sectors, namely artificial intelligence (AI) and space technology. This strategic decision underscores the increasing geopolitical tensions surrounding technological advancements and the global race for dominance in key futuristic industries.

According to a recent Bloomberg report, Ottawa’s latest policy adjustment mandates foreign entities to notify the Canadian government in advance of any intended investments or acquisitions in the AI and space technology sectors. This policy shift is a direct response to escalating global competition for technological supremacy and the need to safeguard Canada’s national interests and security infrastructure.

The sectors of artificial intelligence and space technology are recognized as pivotal arenas for future economic growth, military applications, and societal advancements. The Canadian government’s proactive measures resonate with a broader global trend, where nations are increasingly protective of their indigenous industries against potential foreign exploitation or influence. In the words of an unnamed government official cited by Reuters, this policy revision is a testament to Canada’s commitment to protecting its national security while fostering a safe and competitive technological ecosystem.

Artificial intelligence, in particular, has seen exponential growth and is pivotal in areas ranging from healthcare diagnostics to autonomous vehicle technology. Similarly, the space technology sector has evolved beyond satellite communications, embodying the new frontier for defense capabilities and exploration ventures. Given these technologies’ potential dual-use applications for civilian and military purposes, Canada’s decision reflects a nuanced understanding of the complex dynamics at play.

The policy change is set against the backdrop of heightened global scrutiny over foreign direct investments, especially from countries with contrasting geopolitical agendas. Canada’s stance mirrors initiatives in other countries, like the United States, where the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) has similar mandates, and the European Union, which has been working on establishing a more cohesive framework for screening foreign investments that might pose security risks.

Industry reactions have been varied, with some stakeholders applauding the move as essential for preserving Canada’s competitive edge and securing its technological future. In contrast, others caution about potential impacts on international collaboration and investment flows into Canadian startups. The Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC), for instance, emphasizes the importance of balancing national security with the need to maintain an open, innovative environment conducive to global partnerships.

Experts argue that while the protection of sensitive technologies is paramount, it is equally critical to ensure these measures do not stifle innovation or deter beneficial foreign investments. The challenge lies in crafting policies that are transparent, predictable, and foster an environment where international cooperation can thrive alongside robust national security safeguards.

As the global landscape for technology and investment continues to evolve, Canada’s updated foreign investment rules in AI and space technology serve as a bellwether for how nations navigate the intricate balance between openness and security. This development not only highlights Canada’s strategic positioning but also raises pertinent questions about the future of international technology transfer, collaboration, and competition.

As the world stands on the cusp of a new era marked by technological innovation, the actions taken by countries like Canada will undoubtedly shape the contours of global tech leadership and governance. With national security and economic prosperity at stake, the path forward requires a judicious blend of vigilance, flexibility, and foresight.

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