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Why Black Holes are Misunderstood

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Meet Janna Levin, a physicist whose new book The Black Hole Survival Guide is promising to shed light on black holes, showing that they are a lot more complex than people think.

Black holes are universally regarded as whirlpools that such in and destroy things. Not quite, says Levin.

“People think of black holes as dense objects, and they get caught up in the ‘monster truck’ aspect, that they destroy things,” says Levin.

“And I think that it detracts from some of the more eerie and austere and gorgeous aspects of this very strange phenomenon” she continues during Episode 442 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast.

Sci-fi shows have for a century depicted black holes as violent vortexes that such in and destroy. Levin says the real black holes are far more benign,

“If you were in empty space with complete darkness, and you were right outside a black hole, you wouldn’t know it was there,” she says. “And if you crossed the event horizon, it would be completely undramatic. You could float right across, and not really realize anything was happening, because there’s nothing there.”

In reality, black holes are subject to magnetism and gravity, like many other phenomena. She has even envisioned a future in which we are in a position to harness energy from a black hole.

“I once tried to imagine what it would take for a black hole battery to power New York City,” Levin says. “I think I concluded we would have to use all the resources in the solar system, essentially. Maybe we’d have to make it out of the moon, or a giant Earth-sized magnet. It would be very, very hard to get a lot of power out of it.”

Black holes could also enable people to see further than their own life spans. If you flew into a supermassive black hole, you could remain there for a year and still receive messages from beyond.

Because of time dilation, the messages that you receive could come from a wider span of future history.

“If you knew you had a year to live, but wanted to see your grandchildren born, you could go on this epic journey, so that your children have time to grow up, have their children, and you get to see your grandchildren born,” Levin says.

The entire Janna Levin interview is available on Episode 442 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast.

Some of the highlights are here below:

What Janna Levin has to say about publishing:

“Everyone [at the publisher] was really excited about the concept of this sweet little book, and I think once it arrived, we were all delighted with how tiny it is. I think it’s really a special attribute. Nobody said [it should be longer]. My people are really decent folk. I find that they really believe in the book as the book should be, and they don’t buckle to that kind of psychology, mercifully. Otherwise I don’t think I’d get anything published, if commercial appeal was—I mean, do people really think, ‘Oh, I’d love a book on whether the universe is infinite or finite. And maybe we could have a novel about mathematicians’? So I feel very fortunate to have those collaborators.”

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SpaceX Starship prototype Lands Successfully then Explodes

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SpaceX’s much anticipated Mars landing is closer than ever, after a prototype passed a high-altitude test by landing successfully on earth and exploding eight minutes later. The prototype went into the skies and landed with precision before the explosion.

Starship model SN10 was much close to the goal of a successful and safe vertical landing than versions SN8 and SN9 that came before it.

December 2020 saw SN8 perform its first high-altitude test flight which culminated in it demonstrating re-entry maneuvers before exploding during landing.

Last month, the SN9 completed a 10km flight before it landed in an explosion when one Raptor engine did not ignite.

SN10’s automated fire-suppression system came into play upon landing. The system involves a stream of water trained on the flames burning at the base. The Starship still exploded, after it had launched into the air and back into the ground. SN10 is a full prototype of the final design of the Starship.

SpaceX founder Elon Musk did not immediately comment on what went wrong, but he did tweet about the incident. “Starship 10 landed in one piece! RIP SN10, honorable discharge.”

“SpaceX team is doing great work! One day, the true measure of success will be that Starship flights are commonplace,” he added.

The Starship rocket will be a reusable launch vehicle that Musk hopes will make it affordable for humans to travel in space regularly. It will be 120cm tall and has a heavy booster.

The first round Starship flight will hopefully take place at the end of 2021. Musk hopes that he will take Yusaku Maezawa a Japanese billionaire on a trip around the moon aboard the starship by 2023.

In June 2020, Nasa astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken flew on the SpaceX to the International Space Station. It was the first time for the SpaceX rocket to take human beings to space. Elon Musk hopes that it will be only the first of many such trips.

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eROSITA X-Ray Telescope makes Largest Supernova Remnant discovery yet

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Scientists working with the eROSITA X-ray telescope have stumbled upon the most massive supernova remnant discovered yet using X rays.

Working from aboard the SRG (Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma), the scientists want to put together X-ray technology, radio, and other wavelengths to detect supernova remnants.

“Our aim is to combine expertise across multiple wavelengths, from radio to X-ray, to search for hundreds of supernova remnants (SNRs),” explained co-author Dr. Natasha Hurley-Walker.

Walker is an astronomer with the Curtin University and works with the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR).

Adds Walker: “The eROSITA telescope is 25 times more sensitive than its predecessor ROSAT so we expected to discover new SNRs in coming years, but were pleasantly surprised to have one appear straight away.”

The just discovered SNR is one of the largest to be found using X-Ray and has won the label G249.5+24.5. Only using radio waves have scientists succeeded in spotting larger supernova remnants.

Hoinga is a whopping 90 times larger than the moon. “Adding to our excitement, Hoinga is the largest SNR ever discovered via X-rays, in terms of apparent size: about 90 times larger than the full Moon,” Dr. Hurley-Walker said.

“An enduring mystery surrounding SNRs was the shortfall between the expected number of them in our Galaxy and the number actually identified through past surveys.”

“We expect there to be about 1,200 SNRs in our Galaxy, however only about 300 have been found so far,” Walker added.

“By sifting through archival radio data we discovered Hoinga had been sitting there waiting to be discovered in surveys up to ten years old, but because it was high above the plane of the Milky Way, it was missed.”

“SNRs are not typically expected to be found at high Galactic latitudes so these areas are not usually the focus of surveys, meaning there may be even more of these overlooked remnants out there waiting to be discovered.”

“The radio observations made it possible for us to work out that it is a middle-aged remnant relatively close to Earth, calculations that would have been far less accurate with the X-ray data alone.”

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Hubble Snaps Breathtaking New Image of NGC 2336

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Astronomy enthusiasts can gaze at a gorgeous new image of barred galaxy NGC 2336, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

In the Hubble image NGC 2336 is clearly visible in the image. It is a spiral and barred galaxy that is 109 million light years from the earth and within Camelopardalis constellation.

To create the image, the telescope took multiple exposures within the regions of the spectrum that are visible to the naked eye as well as the infrared regions using the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys, or ACS.

The telescope used three filters to sample the wavelengths and assigned each hue with a monochromatic image linked to a specific filter. This produced the colored image.

The NGC 2336 is also known as the LEDA 21033 and UGC 3809. It is one half of a non-interacting pair of galaxies together with IC 467.

William Tempel, a German astronomer was first to spot the NGC 2336. Tempel was working with a 28 cm telescope when he spotted the galaxy in 1876.

The Hubble enjoys a much better view than Tempel’s rudimentary telescope once had. It is ten times larger than Tempel’s telescope.

NGC 2336 is 200,000 light years across and its arms are adorned with young stars glittering in blue light.

It has a smaller bar and eight spiral arms at the minimum. The central part of the galaxy is more red and occupied by older stars.

NGC 2336 went through a historic supernova in 1987. It was the only supernova to be observed within the galaxy ever since it was discovered by the German astronomer. It was a significant moment for astronomers who had been watching it for 111 years.

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