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eROSITA X-Ray Telescope makes Largest Supernova Remnant discovery yet

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Scientists working with the eROSITA X-ray telescope have stumbled upon the most massive supernova remnant discovered yet using X rays.

Working from aboard the SRG (Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma), the scientists want to put together X-ray technology, radio, and other wavelengths to detect supernova remnants.

“Our aim is to combine expertise across multiple wavelengths, from radio to X-ray, to search for hundreds of supernova remnants (SNRs),” explained co-author Dr. Natasha Hurley-Walker.

Walker is an astronomer with the Curtin University and works with the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR).

Adds Walker: “The eROSITA telescope is 25 times more sensitive than its predecessor ROSAT so we expected to discover new SNRs in coming years, but were pleasantly surprised to have one appear straight away.”

The just discovered SNR is one of the largest to be found using X-Ray and has won the label G249.5+24.5. Only using radio waves have scientists succeeded in spotting larger supernova remnants.

Hoinga is a whopping 90 times larger than the moon. “Adding to our excitement, Hoinga is the largest SNR ever discovered via X-rays, in terms of apparent size: about 90 times larger than the full Moon,” Dr. Hurley-Walker said.

“An enduring mystery surrounding SNRs was the shortfall between the expected number of them in our Galaxy and the number actually identified through past surveys.”

“We expect there to be about 1,200 SNRs in our Galaxy, however only about 300 have been found so far,” Walker added.

“By sifting through archival radio data we discovered Hoinga had been sitting there waiting to be discovered in surveys up to ten years old, but because it was high above the plane of the Milky Way, it was missed.”

“SNRs are not typically expected to be found at high Galactic latitudes so these areas are not usually the focus of surveys, meaning there may be even more of these overlooked remnants out there waiting to be discovered.”

“The radio observations made it possible for us to work out that it is a middle-aged remnant relatively close to Earth, calculations that would have been far less accurate with the X-ray data alone.”

Space

SpaceX Starship prototype Lands Successfully then Explodes

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SpaceX’s much anticipated Mars landing is closer than ever, after a prototype passed a high-altitude test by landing successfully on earth and exploding eight minutes later. The prototype went into the skies and landed with precision before the explosion.

Starship model SN10 was much close to the goal of a successful and safe vertical landing than versions SN8 and SN9 that came before it.

December 2020 saw SN8 perform its first high-altitude test flight which culminated in it demonstrating re-entry maneuvers before exploding during landing.

Last month, the SN9 completed a 10km flight before it landed in an explosion when one Raptor engine did not ignite.

SN10’s automated fire-suppression system came into play upon landing. The system involves a stream of water trained on the flames burning at the base. The Starship still exploded, after it had launched into the air and back into the ground. SN10 is a full prototype of the final design of the Starship.

SpaceX founder Elon Musk did not immediately comment on what went wrong, but he did tweet about the incident. “Starship 10 landed in one piece! RIP SN10, honorable discharge.”

“SpaceX team is doing great work! One day, the true measure of success will be that Starship flights are commonplace,” he added.

The Starship rocket will be a reusable launch vehicle that Musk hopes will make it affordable for humans to travel in space regularly. It will be 120cm tall and has a heavy booster.

The first round Starship flight will hopefully take place at the end of 2021. Musk hopes that he will take Yusaku Maezawa a Japanese billionaire on a trip around the moon aboard the starship by 2023.

In June 2020, Nasa astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken flew on the SpaceX to the International Space Station. It was the first time for the SpaceX rocket to take human beings to space. Elon Musk hopes that it will be only the first of many such trips.

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Space

Hubble Snaps Breathtaking New Image of NGC 2336

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Astronomy enthusiasts can gaze at a gorgeous new image of barred galaxy NGC 2336, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

In the Hubble image NGC 2336 is clearly visible in the image. It is a spiral and barred galaxy that is 109 million light years from the earth and within Camelopardalis constellation.

To create the image, the telescope took multiple exposures within the regions of the spectrum that are visible to the naked eye as well as the infrared regions using the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys, or ACS.

The telescope used three filters to sample the wavelengths and assigned each hue with a monochromatic image linked to a specific filter. This produced the colored image.

The NGC 2336 is also known as the LEDA 21033 and UGC 3809. It is one half of a non-interacting pair of galaxies together with IC 467.

William Tempel, a German astronomer was first to spot the NGC 2336. Tempel was working with a 28 cm telescope when he spotted the galaxy in 1876.

The Hubble enjoys a much better view than Tempel’s rudimentary telescope once had. It is ten times larger than Tempel’s telescope.

NGC 2336 is 200,000 light years across and its arms are adorned with young stars glittering in blue light.

It has a smaller bar and eight spiral arms at the minimum. The central part of the galaxy is more red and occupied by older stars.

NGC 2336 went through a historic supernova in 1987. It was the only supernova to be observed within the galaxy ever since it was discovered by the German astronomer. It was a significant moment for astronomers who had been watching it for 111 years.

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Medical

Scientists will Soon spot Diseases and find exoplanets with super Tiny photonic devices

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Researchers working in Sweden have created a microcomb capable of detecting diseases faster and making optical communications systems more efficient, among other exciting applications.

The scientists at the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have built the photonic device (microcomb) with the capability to produce optical frequencies on a micro resonator – a minute optical cavity.

Effectively, the microcomb is like a ruler of light that measures frequencies with extreme accuracy.

The microcomb generates an array of optical frequencies whose colors are evenly distributed, making it more or less a ruler of light that measures and produces frequencies with extreme accuracy.

The researchers used a chip to develop a new microcomb based on two micro resonators instead of one. The interaction between the two micro resonators is similar to atoms that bind together to create a diatomic molecule known as a photonic molecule.

The microcomb is a device that is readable and capable of being tuned as well as being replicated into something multiple times more efficient than the best devices available at the moment.

The results are extremely significant. “The reason why the results are important is that they represent a unique combination of characteristics, in terms of efficiency, low-power operation and control, that are unprecedented in the field,” explained PhD candidate Óskar Bjarki Helgason.

This is by no means the first time that scientists have created a microcomb on a chip, but it is definitely the first time that scientists have deployed a second micro resonator to beat many of the limitations that have never been surmounted before.

The arrangement has created a number of unique characteristics. The microcomb is so small that it can sit on the tip of a human hair and leaves relatively wide gaps between its teeth.

These wide teeth mean that engineers and researchers have massive opportunities to explore the possibilities.

The microcomb is capable of making optical communication systems vastly more efficient by replacing many lasers with a single microcomb placed in data centers.

The microcombs have great potential for use in lidar to power self-driving vehicles where they can be deployed to record distances, or to calibrate spectrographs deployed in astronomical observations.

Microcombs are also ideal for making optical clocks more accurate as well as improving health monitoring apps in mobile phones, and increasing the accuracy of diagnostic tests that rely on analyzing exhaled air.

“For the technology to be practical and find its use outside the lab, we need to co-integrate additional elements with the micro resonators, such as lasers, modulators, and control electronics,” explained Dr Victor Torres-Company, who is in charge of the Ultrafast Photonics Laboratory at Chalmers University. “This is a huge challenge, that requires maybe five to 10 years and an investment in engineering research, but I am convinced that it will happen.

“The most interesting advances and applications are the ones that we have not even conceived of yet. This will likely be enabled by the possibility of having multiple microcombs on the same chip. What could we achieve with tens of microcombs that we cannot do with one?”

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